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How can I care, hande, and do maintenace of Surgical Instruments?

Surgical instruments are designed to correct physical problems that require surgery. When a good quality surgical instrument is used for the right job, that instrument should last a lifetime. That life can be extended if, during that use, it is cleaned and maintained properly. Before using new instruments, it is important to take the time to inspect each one to ascertain that it is in good shape. That way, if one is defective, it can be sent back to the company for an exchange or refund. Any instrument that does not meet the following standards should be rejected. - All instruments should be checked for roughness or pitting of the surface. - All instruments with moving parts should be checked for smoothness of engaging and disengaging and for proper meshing of the jaws. - If two parts of an instrument are held together by screw, the screw should be tight. If any such defects exist, they facilitate corrosion, rusting, and staining. Certain specific aspects should be examined in some instruments. - The box lock of hemostat should be clamp at the first tooth and produce an audible snap as it engages. - When the instrument is reversed so that the jaws are being held, the ratchet should not spring open when tapped on a table or the palm of a hand. - Scissor should be checked for sharpness. - A good scissors should cut through four layers of gauze when just the tips of the blades are being used. - A scissors shorter than 4 inches should be able to cut through no fewer than two layers. - A needle holder should be checked by clamping and ordinary suture needle into its jaws and closing the box lock to the second tooth; it should not be possible to turn the needle with one’s fingers Soiled instruments must be cleaned as soon as possible after use. Within 10 minutes, blood or tissue left on an instrument starts to break down the instrument’s surface. This causes the instrument to become stained, pitted, or rusty. If instruments cannot be cleaned within that time frame, they should be kept moist by being placed in a wet towel; however, they should not soaked, because that only hastens the breakdown of instruments. Instruments are cleaned by using a scrub brush and cleanser or an ultrasonic cleaner with cleanser. Cleaning detergents and solutions must have a pH of 7 or 8.5 and must be diluted properly to prevent instrument breakdown. All the instruments in a pack are to be cleaned, even if they have not used. The scrub brushes used should be designed specifically for medical instruments. Too hard a bristle can cause damage and fail to get into the cracks and crevices that exist in individual instruments. The instruments should be opened and paced in the cleaning solution. Each instrument must be scrubbed, with attention to the grooves in the jaws, the box locks, and the joints. Then they should be rinsed in water and dried thoroughly, again with attention to the box locks and joints. The moving parts, such as joints , box locks, and ratchets, should be lubricated, using a lubricant that is specially designed for surgical instruments and is steam penetrable An ultrasonic cleaner provides rapid and thorough cleaning of an instrument. It works by producing bubbles that implode against the instrument, “blasting” the debris from the surface. This action cleans the instrument in places where brushes cannot reach. Before using this type of cleaner, all the instruments should be divided into two groups: sharp and nonsharp. Then they should be separated according to type of material, such as brass, stainless steel, and so forth. All ratchets should be opened, and any instrument designed to be taken apart should be separated. The instruments are placed in the rack provided, without overfilling it. The cleaner is then filled with water and the cleansing agent added. The cleansing agent should be specifically designed for an ultrasonic cleaner. The timer is set for 10 to 15 minutes. The tray should be removed properly once the timer has gone off, and the instruments should be rinsed thoroughly with water, then carefully dried and lubricated. Many elements contribute to the breakdown of instruments. The top three are tap water, surgical wraps, and moisture. By learning about them, users can prevent high quality instruments from becoming stained, pitted, or rusted. An improper water source for an autoclave can be an instrument killer. Tap water contains minerals that, when vaporized, become concentrated and form layers on an instrument. As concentrated and form layers on an instrument. As the instrument dries, the minerals cause pitting and corrosion. An autoclave should always be filled with distilled water to prevent the buildup of minerals. If an autoclave is supplied by a direct line, it is important to check the owner’s manual for instructions on cleaning the steam line filter. Surgical wraps also cause instrument breakdown. Most detergents are alkaline based, and most washing machines do not rinse well enough to remove the metallic ions hat remain in materials. The instruments are wrapped in these fabrics and placed in an autoclave that produces steam, which vaporizes these metallic ions and deposits them onto the surgical instruments. For this reason, an auto clave should be cleaned on a weekly basis to prevent the buildup of minerals and metallic ions. Surgical wraps should be sent through two rinse cycles. It is also advisable to avoid overloading the washing machine when cleaning surgical wraps. Moisture also damages instruments. Moisture damage can occur if the autoclave is not allowed to go through the drying cycle and if the instruments are not allowed to dry on a rack before being put away. Both of these practices cause the wrapped packages to develop condensation, which not only contaminated the pack but also causes the instruments to rust or corrode. Soaking instruments in cold-sterilization solutions for extended periods causes rust unless a rust prohibit solution is being used Surgical instruments are designed to correct physical problems that require surgery. When a good quality surgical instrument is used for the right job, that instrument should last a lifetime. That life can be extended if, during that use, it is cleaned and maintained properly. Before using new instruments, it is important to take the time to inspect each one to ascertain that it is in good shape. That way, if one is defective, it can be sent back to the company for an exchange or refund. Any instrument that does not meet the following standards should be rejected. - All instruments should be checked for roughness or pitting of the surface. - All instruments with moving parts should be checked for smoothness of engaging and disengaging and for proper meshing of the jaws. - If two parts of an instrument are held together by screw, the screw should be tight. If any such defects exist, they facilitate corrosion, rusting, and staining. Certain specific aspects should be examined in some instruments. - The box lock of hemostat should be clamp at the first tooth and produce an audible snap as it engages. - When the instrument is reversed so that the jaws are being held, the ratchet should not spring open when tapped on a table or the palm of a hand. - Scissor should be checked for sharpness. - A good scissors should cut through four layers of gauze when just the tips of the blades are being used. - A scissors shorter than 4 inches should be able to cut through no fewer than two layers. - A needle holder should be checked by clamping and ordinary suture needle into its jaws and closing the box lock to the second tooth; it should not be possible to turn the needle with one’s fingers Soiled instruments must be cleaned as soon as possible after use. Within 10 minutes, blood or tissue left on an instrument starts to break down the instrument’s surface. This causes the instrument to become stained, pitted, or rusty. If instruments cannot be cleaned within that time frame, they should be kept moist by being placed in a wet towel; however, they should not soaked, because that only hastens the breakdown of instruments. Instruments are cleaned by using a scrub brush and cleanser or an ultrasonic cleaner with cleanser. Cleaning detergents and solutions must have a pH of 7 or 8.5 and must be diluted properly to prevent instrument breakdown. All the instruments in a pack are to be cleaned, even if they have not used. The scrub brushes used should be designed specifically for medical instruments. Too hard a bristle can cause damage and fail to get into the cracks and crevices that exist in individual instruments. The instruments should be opened and paced in the cleaning solution. Each instrument must be scrubbed, with attention to the grooves in the jaws, the box locks, and the joints. Then they should be rinsed in water and dried thoroughly, again with attention to the box locks and joints. The moving parts, such as joints , box locks, and ratchets, should be lubricated, using a lubricant that is specially designed for surgical instruments and is steam penetrable An ultrasonic cleaner provides rapid and thorough cleaning of an instrument. It works by producing bubbles that implode against the instrument, “blasting” the debris from the surface. This action cleans the instrument in places where brushes cannot reach. Before using this type of cleaner, all the instruments should be divided into two groups: sharp and nonsharp. Then they should be separated according to type of material, such as brass, stainless steel, and so forth. All ratchets should be opened, and any instrument designed to be taken apart should be separated. The instruments are placed in the rack provided, without overfilling it. The cleaner is then filled with water and the cleansing agent added. The cleansing agent should be specifically designed for an ultrasonic cleaner. The timer is set for 10 to 15 minutes. The tray should be removed properly once the timer has gone off, and the instruments should be rinsed thoroughly with water, then carefully dried and lubricated. Many elements contribute to the breakdown of instruments. The top three are tap water, surgical wraps, and moisture. By learning about them, users can prevent high quality instruments from becoming stained, pitted, or rusted. An improper water source for an autoclave can be an instrument killer. Tap water contains minerals that, when vaporized, become concentrated and form layers on an instrument. As concentrated and form layers on an instrument. As the instrument dries, the minerals cause pitting and corrosion. An autoclave should always be filled with distilled water to prevent the buildup of minerals. If an autoclave is supplied by a direct line, it is important to check the owner’s manual for instructions on cleaning the steam line filter. Surgical wraps also cause instrument breakdown. Most detergents are alkaline based, and most washing machines do not rinse well enough to remove the metallic ions hat remain in materials. The instruments are wrapped in these fabrics and placed in an autoclave that produces steam, which vaporizes these metallic ions and deposits them onto the surgical instruments. For this reason, an auto clave should be cleaned on a weekly basis to prevent the buildup of minerals and metallic ions. Surgical wraps should be sent through two rinse cycles. It is also advisable to avoid overloading the washing machine when cleaning surgical wraps. Moisture also damages instruments. Moisture damage can occur if the autoclave is not allowed to go through the drying cycle and if the instruments are not allowed to dry on a rack before being put away. Both of these practices cause the wrapped packages to develop condensation, which not only contaminated the pack but also causes the instruments to rust or corrode. Soaking instruments in cold-sterilization solutions for extended periods causes rust unless a rust prohibit solution is being used Surgical instruments are designed to correct physical problems that require surgery. When a good quality surgical instrument is used for the right job, that instrument should last a lifetime. That life can be extended if, during that use, it is cleaned and maintained properly. Before using new instruments, it is important to take the time to inspect each one to ascertain that it is in good shape. That way, if one is defective, it can be sent back to the company for an exchange or refund. Any instrument that does not meet the following standards should be rejected. - All instruments should be checked for roughness or pitting of the surface. - All instruments with moving parts should be checked for smoothness of engaging and disengaging and for proper meshing of the jaws. - If two parts of an instrument are held together by screw, the screw should be tight. If any such defects exist, they facilitate corrosion, rusting, and staining. Certain specific aspects should be examined in some instruments. - The box lock of hemostat should be clamp at the first tooth and produce an audible snap as it engages. - When the instrument is reversed so that the jaws are being held, the ratchet should not spring open when tapped on a table or the palm of a hand. - Scissor should be checked for sharpness. - A good scissors should cut through four layers of gauze when just the tips of the blades are being used. - A scissors shorter than 4 inches should be able to cut through no fewer than two layers. - A needle holder should be checked by clamping and ordinary suture needle into its jaws and closing the box lock to the second tooth; it should not be possible to turn the needle with one’s fingers Soiled instruments must be cleaned as soon as possible after use. Within 10 minutes, blood or tissue left on an instrument starts to break down the instrument’s surface. This causes the instrument to become stained, pitted, or rusty. If instruments cannot be cleaned within that time frame, they should be kept moist by being placed in a wet towel; however, they should not soaked, because that only hastens the breakdown of instruments. Instruments are cleaned by using a scrub brush and cleanser or an ultrasonic cleaner with cleanser. Cleaning detergents and solutions must have a pH of 7 or 8.5 and must be diluted properly to prevent instrument breakdown. All the instruments in a pack are to be cleaned, even if they have not used. The scrub brushes used should be designed specifically for medical instruments. Too hard a bristle can cause damage and fail to get into the cracks and crevices that exist in individual instruments. The instruments should be opened and paced in the cleaning solution. Each instrument must be scrubbed, with attention to the grooves in the jaws, the box locks, and the joints. Then they should be rinsed in water and dried thoroughly, again with attention to the box locks and joints. The moving parts, such as joints , box locks, and ratchets, should be lubricated, using a lubricant that is specially designed for surgical instruments and is steam penetrable An ultrasonic cleaner provides rapid and thorough cleaning of an instrument. It works by producing bubbles that implode against the instrument, “blasting” the debris from the surface. This action cleans the instrument in places where brushes cannot reach. Before using this type of cleaner, all the instruments should be divided into two groups: sharp and nonsharp. Then they should be separated according to type of material, such as brass, stainless steel, and so forth. All ratchets should be opened, and any instrument designed to be taken apart should be separated. The instruments are placed in the rack provided, without overfilling it. The cleaner is then filled with water and the cleansing agent added. The cleansing agent should be specifically designed for an ultrasonic cleaner. The timer is set for 10 to 15 minutes. The tray should be removed properly once the timer has gone off, and the instruments should be rinsed thoroughly with water, then carefully dried and lubricated. Many elements contribute to the breakdown of instruments. The top three are tap water, surgical wraps, and moisture. By learning about them, users can prevent high quality instruments from becoming stained, pitted, or rusted. An improper water source for an autoclave can be an instrument killer. Tap water contains minerals that, when vaporized, become concentrated and form layers on an instrument. As concentrated and form layers on an instrument. As the instrument dries, the minerals cause pitting and corrosion. An autoclave should always be filled with distilled water to prevent the buildup of minerals. If an autoclave is supplied by a direct line, it is important to check the owner’s manual for instructions on cleaning the steam line filter. Surgical wraps also cause instrument breakdown. Most detergents are alkaline based, and most washing machines do not rinse well enough to remove the metallic ions hat remain in materials. The instruments are wrapped in these fabrics and placed in an autoclave that produces steam, which vaporizes these metallic ions and deposits them onto the surgical instruments. For this reason, an auto clave should be cleaned on a weekly basis to prevent the buildup of minerals and metallic ions. Surgical wraps should be sent through two rinse cycles. It is also advisable to avoid overloading the washing machine when cleaning surgical wraps. Moisture also damages instruments. Moisture damage can occur if the autoclave is not allowed to go through the drying cycle and if the instruments are not allowed to dry on a rack before being put away. Both of these practices cause the wrapped packages to develop condensation, which not only contaminated the pack but also causes the instruments to rust or corrode. Soaking instruments in cold-sterilization solutions for extended periods causes rust unless a rust prohibit solution is being used

How can I review my purchasing history?

Click on “My Account” and view your “Past Order” by the date of the order from most recent to oldest.

How can I search an Instrument?

You can search and filter to select Catalog, Instrument Type, Category, Use In (procedure), and/or Tray.

How should I care for my instruments?

Click here to download our instrument care instructions.

Is ordering on-line from www.ShaGhaSurgicare.com safe?

Your email, password, name, and address are protected via SSL latest advanced encryption. Once you are ready to place an order your payment is processed via PayPal account. We DO NOT capture, store, or see your credit card / banking information. www.ShaGhaSurgicare.com is verified as a secure e-Commerce website by VeriSign, the industry standard in online security compliance.

What about delivery charges?

Standard Orders/Packages (up to a maximum of 2kgs or 4.4lbs) over $250.00 in sales qualify for complimentary shipping. This may be extended to additional orders based on individual packaging requirements. All packages are sent by Canada Post or Purolator Courier. Delivery in Canada (1-8 business days), standard package* rates: BC, AB, SK, MB, ON: $10.95 QC, NS, NF, PEI, NB: $14.95 NT, NU, YT: $22.95 Delivery in USA (7-12 business days), standard packages*: $16.95 Canada Post / USPS All Special Orders/Larger Equipment/Equipment Bundles will incur additional shipping times/costs as these items are not in the local inventory. Delivery is charged per order and not per item. Taxes are applicable. Heavy items may be subject to additional shipping charges. We will contact you in the event that additional charges apply. Individual items may have additional shipping due to an item's weight (boxes of plaster, 4L jugs of liquid, etc). Please make note of your shipping fees prior to confirming your order.

What about delivery time-frame?

Standard time-frames reflect a minimum of 2-3 weeks for all item orders. Please note that some items may be delayed when crossing through customs and delivery can be longer than expected. Please also note that time-frames are: - based on major centres as more remote locations can incur additional delivery time - based on 'IN STOCK' items only. At times the supplier may not have the inventory and our store may sell out of certain items. These items are brought in from suppliers across Germany, Pakistan, and Brazil, and an order can incur a longer delivery time frame than listed above.

What causes stains on my instruments? What is staining?

Staining is a surface deposit on instruments, and most often mistaken for rust. After autoclaving, you may notice a stain on your instruments. Rusting instruments are very rare. Stains on instruments appear in many colors and, in most cases, the colors tell you about the origin of the stain. ·         Orange / Brown stain - The problem is most often a phosphate layer (brown to light orange) on the instrument, which develops as a result of any of the following causes: ·         Orange / Brown stain - The problem is most often a phosphate layer (brown to light orange) on the instrument, which develops as a result of any of the following causes: o    water sources, o    detergents used to wash and clean instruments, o    surgical wrappings, o    cold sterilization solutions, or o    dried blood. ·         Black stain - The most common black stains are due to an acid reaction. Black stains may result from detergents used to clean the instrument; similar to brown stains caused by high pH in detergents. The black acid type stain can be caused by low pH (less than six) during autoclaving. ·         Dark Brown stain - are usually a result of dried blood left on an instrument. Blood should be removed from the surface of the instrument immediately. It will break down the instruments surface with a chemical reaction. ·         Bluish / Black stain - These are usually a result of plating and are extremely difficult to remove from the surface. The surface beneath the stain is always smooth, but the instrument may have to be refinished to obtain good results. The cause for this stain is the mixing of dissimilar metals in ultrasonic cleaners and during autoclaving. Multi-color stains are most often due to excessive heat (chromium oxide stains), and actually show rainbow colors with a blue or brown overtone. When the instrument shows these heat stains, it may have lost part of its original hardness, and may not perform well. These instruments can usually be refinished, and the hardness tested. The staining can be polished off. Please note stains are either deposited onto instrument's surface, plated on, or in the case of rusting, developed from the instrument itself. The most common discoloration is due to deposit stains and usually occurs during autoclaving. To minimize staining, it is important that the autoclave runs perfectly, and that it has a well-functioning drying cycle. The instruments should come out completely dry, whether in wrappers or loose on a tray. If any moisture is left in the pack, or on the instruments, it will result in tiny water droplets on the instrument surface, which will leave a circular stain after drying. The color of this stain will depend on the pH, as well as the mineral or metal contents of the water. If the drying cycle works perfectly, however, there is a much less chance for deposits to form on the surface of the instrument. Stains due to metal deposits or plating stains are always near the most magnetic parts of the instrument. New instruments are often highly magnetic in the locks, the serrations and ratchets. This happens because the carbon steel tools used to work on the instruments during production are very magnetic themselves. This magnetism wears off gradually during handling and sterilization. This is the reason why newer instruments tend to stain more visibly.

What information will I need to set-up an account?

It is simple and quick, all you need is your email address, a password and your first name and last name. A mailing / shipping address is also required when you make your first order.

What is the minimum $US amount I can order?

There is no minimum $US amount you have to order. We appreciate every opportunity to service the needs of our customers.

What should I always do (best practices) ?

• Check all instructions for use and sterilization of new instruments. Unless otherwise directed, they should be inspected, cleaned, rinsed and lubricated before being put into service. • Lubricate after cleaning with a proprietary water-soluble instrument lubricant. • Ensure all instruments are only used for the purpose for which they were designed. • Handle all instruments gently. Never overstrain, drop or misuse them. • Check all instruments for damage after use, especially microsurgical and insulated instruments. • Dismantle, clean and decontaminate all instruments in cold water as soon as possible after use, giving particular attention to serrations, joints and ratchets. Failure to do so may result in the instrument becoming stained with the possibility of stiff joints. • Give special attention to microsurgical instruments. Their fine tips can easily be damaged by contact with other instruments or the sides of the case in which they should be kept. Hand cleaning is preferable. • Ensure that the detergent is of the manufacturers recommended strength if ultrasonic or cleaning machines are used. • Ensure all instruments are thoroughly dried before being stored. • Pack instruments carefully with the heavier ones lying on a piece of cloth or towel at the bottom. • Store and sterilize bow handled instruments on a special holder. Always leave racks and ratchets open. • Check the hardness of the water used in the autoclave. Too hard water will leave a deposit on the instruments. • If a water softener is used ensure it is at the manufacturers recommended level. Too much may cause discoloration or pitting.

What should I never do ?

• Misuse surgical instruments or overstrain joints or racks. • Leave soiled instruments to dry. If it is impossible to clean them immediately after use, soak them in cold water for as short a period as possible. • Use abrasives on instruments as this will spoil the surface finish. This may later cause discoloration, rusting or pitting. • "Impact" mark or "vibra-etch" instruments. This can lead to failure of the instrument at a later date. • Handle microsurgical instruments by their tips. These should be cleaned by trained personnel only who will ensure the delicate working ends are adequately protected during storage or sterilization. • Dismantle, clean and decontaminate all instruments in cold water as soon as possible after use, giving particular attention to serrations, joints and ratchets. Failure to do so may result in the instrument becoming stained with the possibility of stiff joints. • Pack microsurgical instruments with other, heavier instruments. Remember always - heavy instruments on the bottom and light instruments on the top. • Use general purpose oils for instruments, only water soluble lubricants should be used. • Use forceps to handle endoscopes. This will help to avoid them being scratched, dented or dropped. • Leave instruments soaking longer than necessary in chemical sterilizing solutions. After they have been sterilized they should be washed thoroughly in warm water to remove all traces of the chemicals to prevent discoloration or pitting. • Store damp instruments. They must be thoroughly dried first.